Issues to look out for

Horses express their emotions, thoughts, fears and pain/discomfort through their behavior and body language .It is up to us as their caregivers to recognize these signs and take steps to alleviate any pain or discomfort

 

Do you know there are primary issues that will cause tension/pain/discomfort within the musculoskeletal system of the horse? These primary issues tend to lead to behavioral, performance and balance problems. If the primary issues are not addressed and improvements made then tension/pain/discomfort will always be present in the body and the pain cycle will continue.

 

Below are some examples of primary issues that tend to not be easily identifiable. These issues can lead to further secondary issues which in turn can cause pain and restriction.

 

Primary Issues:
- Foot and lower leg pain

- Saddle and other tack
- Dental issues
- Riding style
- Conformational/Straightness issues

 

 

 

Below is a list of possible problems that are easier to recognize and can be either primary issues, secondary issues, or both:

- Lead change problems

- Not using their back

- Resisting the bit

- Heavy on the forehand

- Not stepping under behind

- Falling in/out

- Holds head flat, crooked

- Intermittent lameness

- Does not move out with front legs

- Choppy, short strided

- Not tracking up

- Girthy/sensitive to touch while grooming and/or tacking up

- Sensitive to touch around poll area

- Head shy

- Ewe-necked, hollow-backed

- Doesn't bend in body, unable to do lateral work

- Excessive shaking of the head

- Excessive stretching of the head/neck

- Formerly agile, now lazy/unwilling to move forward

- Refuses jumps, knocks poles

- Unable to back up

- Bucking, rushing

-Unable to work up or down hills

-Hitches leg or drags toe

-Change in personality/ disposition / eating habits

 

This is not to diagnose actual physical problems. Your vet is responsible for diagnosing. If there is any doubt of a serious physical problem, contact your vet immediately and get approval to start or continue with bodywork.  The more information is available the better it is to figure out the source of the problems and develop a proper treatment plan.

 

Regardless of the horse’s activity level, numerous issues including environment, stress, over-exertion, or even lack of exercise, can impact the biomechanics of the horse
and the functioning of the muscles, causing restrictions and imbalances, putting them at greater risk for injury.

 

Jenna's work will increase circulation to the affected areas and help release adhesions, which will help the body in healing. The release of the soft tissue around joints will help increase synovial fluid production and range of motion of the affected joint.

 

Use of essential oils, different methods that use the horse’s nervous system to allow them to truly let go and release tensions, and holistic mindset will help bring the horse’s mind, body, and spirit back into balance.

 

It is so important that routine equine bodywork accompanies regular veterinary care, balanced nutrition, training, and regular dental and hoof care to support your horses' balance, musculoskeletal health, overall wellness, and optimum performance.

 

 

****ALWAYS CONSULT YOUR VETERINARIAN. EQUINE MASSAGE AND BODYWORK IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE THE ADVICE AND TREATMENT OF A QUALIFIED VETERINARIAN. EQUINE MASSAGE AND BODYWORK SHOULD BE A SUPPLEMENTAL THERAPY TO REGULAR VETERINARY CARE.****

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Rehabilitation is a process; it is a journey; it is hard work; it is life. There is no miracle but, as it involves love and friends and had work, it is a miracle.~ Jean  Luc Cornille

Photo Credit: Yanina May Photography
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